Janet Uhlar | 2024 April

April, 2024

 

“Whitey” Bulger is dead. He never liked being call Whitey. His name was James. I called him Jim. I took part in sending him to prison 5 years ago as a juror in a highly orchestrated trial. A trial that never had to be. Jim wanted to plead guilty to all charges, and was willing to accept an expedited death sentence. A trial that never had to be, because …

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According to reporter Ephrat Livni at Quartz (10/2/18) a “new Supreme Court case aims to close the huge loophole in US “double jeopardy” law.” (see link to article below). The Supreme Court has a case on its docket this term (Gamble vs. USA) that could possibly result in the release of former FBI Agent John Connolly.  In this case, the Court will decide whether or not to abolish the …

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On September 11, The Associated Press released an article about Frank Salemme’s sentencing (please see link below). According to the article, “Before being sentenced, Salemme stood up and said the “real story” will one day come out.” I hope so. Certainly, Salemme is a scary guy. Certainly, he has been involved in the murder of many–after all, he was a Mafia Boss! The question is, was he involved in …

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According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Flip means: to cause or persuade (a witness) to cooperate in prosecuting a criminal case against an associate. It’s regularly used within the American Judicial System, by federal, state, and county prosecutors. Certainly, it has its place in persuading a lesser criminal to offer information on a more dangerous or corrupt individual. In white collar crimes, it’s an effective tool–within limits. White collar crime focuses …

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The Truth Be Damned was written in response to the depth of corruption within Boston’s Department of Justice, which I witnessed first hand as a juror in the trial of Irish mob boss Whitey Bulger. Yes, Bulger was found guilty of most of the charges, but this did not justify the orchestrated trial (the fact that Bulger wanted to plead guilty to all charges and accept an expedited sentence, …

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Please read Nathalie Baptiste’s excellent article in Mother Jones, July 9, 2018: https://www.motherjones.com/crime-justice/2018/07/prosecutors-are-using-jailhouse-snitches-to-send-innocent-people-to-death-row/ Our judicial system is spinning out of control. We are losing confidence and trust in “the good guys,” as we see again and again innocent citizens being abused by police. We hear of false charges pursued, regardless of lack of evidence. We learn of individuals in prison for decades for crimes they did not commit. (And, …

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When lecturing on the American Revolution, I start by pointing out a fact we have lost sight of, or perhaps never truly understood. There was a sense of purity in the War for Independence. It wasn’t fought over oil, resources, wealth, women, insults, or even power. It wasn’t waged by the rich and fought by the poor. The colonists weren’t being systematically brutalized by the British. Prior to the …

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In the 1950’s and 60’s the CIA experimented on US citizens with LSD. It was referred to as the MKUltra Project. Those used for the experiment were not informed. When the CIA was exposed, they attempted, unsuccessfully, to destroy all records. In 1977, the US Senate called for a hearing to investigate the MKUltra Project. What was revealed? The CIA wanted to create the perfect soldier; one who would …

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As a star witness in the federal trial of former mob boss Frank Salemme, Steve Flemmi recently admitted that he was involved in “about 50 murders.” In 2003, he avoided the death penalty by confessing to Assistant US Attorney Fred Wyshak his involvement in 10 killings and cooperating with prosecutors by telling them what they wanted to hear (didn’t seem to matter whether or not it was true.) Wyshak submitted …

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A “Lynching Memorial” now exists in Montgomery, Alabama (National Memorial for Peace and Justice). It’s purpose is to address and recognize mass murders by lynching, and injustices shown to hundreds of Americans of African descent. Injustices which were not limited to the South. Boston’s history has its own version of Lynching. On a cold, winter night in 1968, John Martorano was offered a ride by Herb Smith, manager of …

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